5 popular Nigerian myths

0
35

 

There are still many ancient rituals that are strongly ingrained in many tribes, including the telling of stories about evil spirits, demons, and the occult.

5 popular Nigerian myths
Source: istockphoto.com

5 popular Nigerian myths: Myths and legends have been told from one generation to the next in Nigeria for centuries. Here are some interesting myths and stories that some Nigerians hold dear.

1. Whistling in the night draws devils to your home

Whistling late at night is forbidden and is said to bring about calamitous results in a traditional folktale from Nigeria. Whistling, according to one urban legend, is a form of communication with ghosts. People from several tribes have recounted instances in which they whistled and were afterwards confronted by malevolent spirits, snakes, members of the occult, or even found themselves in unfamiliar locations.

2. Using a broom or turning stick to beat a young boy

There is a widespread belief among certain Nigerians that if you beat a kid with a turning stick (Omorogun) or a broom, you can reduce the size of his penis. If a young man has been struck on the head with a broom, the youngster must return the favor by striking the same person seven times with the same broom.

3. Someone stepping over your legs

It is a common superstition that if someone walks over your legs, you will one day give birth to children who resemble the individual who did so. Nobody can explain how or why this keeps happening. When someone tries to get by them, pregnant ladies quickly move their legs out of the way so that others can pass.

READ ALSO:   Here are 7 best countries for immigration from Nigeria

4. Reincarnation

One of the most widely circulated myths in Nigeria is the one that is told about the Yoruba people. In this myth, the ancestors of the deceased are said to come back to their family in the form of a newborn baby. The likeness that a child bears to an individual who has passed away is one way to identify that child.

For instance, a boy who looks like his grandfather on his father’s side can be given the name Babatunde, which means “father comes back.” Their belief that a person’s ghost can go to another town and live there as if they were not dead, even getting married and having children there, is the most peculiar aspect of their culture. They believe that if a person dies at a young age, their ghost can go to another town and live there as if they were not dead.

5. Sun and Rain

This is another another widespread urban legend. People, particularly those who hunt, have the misconception that if it rains when the sun is out, a lioness is giving birth somewhere nearby.


nigerian myths, nigeria mythology, nigerian mythology, legends in nigeria, nigeria legends,
nigerian mythological creatures, nigerian mythical creatures

nigerian myths, nigeria mythology, nigerian mythology, legends in nigeria, nigeria legends, nigerian mythological creatures, nigerian mythical creatures