Saturday, September 19, 2020

More than 463 million schoolchildren lack access to distance learning: UNICEF

Must Read

Will the refineries work this time? –

. refinery... Within NNPC's plan to reactivate local productionBy Ibrahim Awalu In what has been described...

Osimhen talks about facing Cristiano Ronaldo in Serie A

Napoli's new forward Victor Osimhen has said he is looking forward to playing Juventus star Cristiano Ronaldo in his...

Web Designer / Developer at Smash Group

Web Designer / Developer at Smash Group: Smash Group is a combination of almost a decade of visionary leadership,...

The United Nations in a new report says that more than 463 million school-age children worldwide lack access to distance learning, following the closure of schools due to COVID-19.

This represents almost a third of the 1.5 billion schoolchildren in the world affected by the closures, according to the report released by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) on Thursday.

UNICEF said the situation is mainly due to the lack of distance learning policies or the lack of equipment necessary to learn at home.

The report highlights the significant inequality in access to distance learning across regions, with school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa being the most affected.

According to UNICEF, half of all students in sub-Saharan Africa cannot access distance learning.

He said the study examined the availability of home-based technology and tools necessary for remote learning among pre-primary, primary, primary and secondary school children, with data from 100 countries.

The data included access to television, radio and the Internet, and the availability of curriculum delivered on these platforms during school closings, according to the agency.

“Students from rural areas consistently represent the vast majority of those who cannot be reached by any of the three distance learning modalities analyzed.

“This is independent of the level of economic development of the country.

“In general, three out of four students, who cannot be reached, live in rural areas, but in lower-income countries the percentage is even higher.

“Additionally, students in the poorest 40 percent of families represent a disproportionately high percentage of those who cannot be reached.

“In low-income countries, they represent 47 percent of those who cannot be reached, while in middle-income countries they represent 74 to 86 percent of those who cannot be reached.

“Boys and girls were almost equally represented among the unreachable students,” UNICEF said in a fact sheet on the report.

He said the actual number of students left behind was likely significantly higher than estimated in the report, “which reflects best-case scenarios based on the policies that were put in place and the technologies available in homes.

YAYA

- Advertisement -

Latest News

Will the refineries work this time? –

. refinery... Within NNPC's plan to reactivate local productionBy Ibrahim Awalu In what has been described...

Osimhen talks about facing Cristiano Ronaldo in Serie A

Napoli's new forward Victor Osimhen has said he is looking forward to playing Juventus star Cristiano Ronaldo in his Serie A debut campaign. Osimhen moved...

Web Designer / Developer at Smash Group

Web Designer / Developer at Smash Group: Smash Group is a combination of almost a decade of visionary leadership, hard work and dedication from...

Consultant obstetrician gynecologist discovers new techniques to stop bleeding in postpartum women

By Peter Okutu A consultant obstetrician gynecologist working at Alex Ekwueme Federal University Hospital, Abakaliki, Dr. Chidi Esike, has discovered a new technique to stop...

Gospel music is suppressed in Nigeria – Mercy Oseghale

By Prisca Sam-Duru Mercy Oseghale, an award-winning contemporary Nigerian gospel singer and pastor, is an artist who firmly believes that gospel music is not getting...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -